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RDP Icon in Desktop and Optimal Command LIne Switches for WAN Connections (slow Conne
24-03-2015, 05:59 PM, (This post was last modified: 24-03-2015, 05:59 PM by Axel Gruber.)
#1
RDP Icon in Desktop and Optimal Command LIne Switches for WAN Connections (slow Conne
Hello

i want to ask for best Commandline Options for Slow WAN Connections (permanent Cache and so on...) for freerdp and rdesktop.

Second:

How do i make Desktop Icons for such RDP Connections ?

Best Regards
Axel Gruber
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24-03-2015, 08:52 PM,
#2
RE: RDP Icon in Desktop and Optimal Command LIne Switches for WAN Connections (slow Conne
Hi Axel,

This post will help you with figuring some settings for rdesktop (sorry, I haven't used freerdp so I can't comment on the best settings) - http://forum.armtc.net/showthread.php?ti...77#pid2077. This link also has a reference to the full list of command line switches used by rdesktop.

As for creating your own Desktop Icon, I've struggled with this myself. I don't have a definitive answer for you yet but here's what I know so far:

Application shortcuts all live in the same place it seems in XFCE. Look in /usr/share/applications/ and you will see a ton of .desktop files. This is important to know because you may need to know this location for later...

The shortcuts on rpitc are in two places (as far as I can tell)...Docky is used for icons that show on the left of the desktop and the xfce panel shows at the bottom.

The xfce panel at the bottom of your screen...I've searched and found this in two ways...For the Terminal Lovers out there...I found it on my home directory under ~/.config/xfce4/panel/launcher-* where I found 4 launcher folders (9-12). Look into one of these launcher folders and you will see a .desktop file with a bunch of numbers in front of it. If you read the .desktop file (use nano) you can see that the familiar lines that make up the shortcut. At the bottom you will also see the location of the source file. For the Terminal Adverse you can also get there by right clicking on your desktop, Go to Settings then Panel. In Panel go to the Items tab. Here you will see the layout of the icons you see at the bottom including any separators. Edit each 'Launcher' Item to see what each Launcher is for...you'll see one for Browser, File Manager, Terminal...etc.

So that is the panel at the bottom...now onto Docky. This is where I'm struggling so hopefully someone can add in their wisdom on how to make this work or perhaps what I've found will be useful to someone else who will take it further and expand on it.

I can't find a Docky Settings Editor to help me with adding removing shortcuts from Docky. But it seems you can simply drag and drop icons in and out of Docky. Be careful though how you do this...I dragged an icon out of Docky to my Desktop and it blew up and disappeared. No lie...If you do this the icon drops on the desktop and turns to a puff of smoke and then 'Poof it was gone'. Not sure why this happens...I don't know where it goes either. So that being said I would suggest you create your own .desktop shortcut (look in /usr/share/applications/ to see how to build one yourself) or copy a shortcut you need from /usr/share/applications/ (I would suggest Copy and not Move). Build you desktop item in a folder in your home folder. Then using your file manager drag the .desktop icon you created/copied and drag it into the Docky section on your desktop.

Hopefully this helps you get started...again I'm not at all familiar with XFCE and was much more familiar with rpitc when it used LXDE. But hopefully someone with more experience that me will jump in and help or at least confirm that I haven't led you astray.

Good Luck!
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26-03-2015, 04:40 PM, (This post was last modified: 26-03-2015, 04:42 PM by admin.)
#3
RE: RDP Icon in Desktop and Optimal Command LIne Switches for WAN Connections (slow Conne
(24-03-2015, 05:59 PM)Axel Gruber Wrote: Hello

i want to ask for best Commandline Options for Slow WAN Connections (permanent Cache and so on...) for freerdp and rdesktop.

Slow WAN Connection mean high latency or low bandwidth?

I think you can try to use the compression option: +compression and upgrade the server RDP protocol to version 8 (Win7 and Win2008R2 default is 7.1 i think) as explained here: http://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2592687
Also disabling audio redirection and some effect like -themes and -wallpaper will reduce a little bit the bandwidth needed.
You can also test the /network:modem parameter:
/network:<type> Network connection type (type can be modem, broadband[-low|-high], wan, lan, auto[detect])
Last you can test the connection without caching parameters:
-bitmap-cache (default:on) bitmap cache
-offscreen-cache (default:on) offscreen bitmap cache
-glyph-cache (default:on) glyph cache
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30-03-2015, 05:51 PM,
#4
RE: RDP Icon in Desktop and Optimal Command LIne Switches for WAN Connections (slow Conne
Hello

this mean depending on the Place where RPI2 is:

Place1: High Bandwidth - but bad Latency (Cable)
Place2: Slow Bandwidth and good latency (slow DSL)
Place2: MID Bandwidth and good latency (midrange DSL)

Do you speak about xfreerdp and dfreerdp or rdesktop ?

We also have a Server within the lan of eache Place so we have 2 different Connections.

the Server within the LAN should be used for video Playback - i know its not optimal on RDP - but it seem to work. (just Youtube and Training Videos).

I found a Problem here:

Xfreerdp seem to have a better Video Performance but Audio has a delay of 1-2 seconds so its out of sync - i tryed different settings but no one realy works fine

rdesktop can playback audio / Video in Sync but Video Performance is not so good.

So i look forward for dfreerdp and hope its better here....

CU
GTR
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